The Ones Who Show Up

BlackLivesMatter“Imagine if….We are a visionary church, leading our greater community and forming interfaith partnerships in our unquenchable thirst for social, economic, and environmental justice.”
 
Last Wednesday evening, I caught a glimpse of this courageous dream written by our provocative proposals team becoming reality.  It was late in the prayer meeting held by the Abysinnian Christian Church.  By then, we had all shed tears, sat in silence, shaken our heads and sung out loud, all to honor the Mother Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston, the churches that have been burned in the south, as well as the rage and grief we feel at the continued presence of racism and white supremacy.
I had just offered my prayer, and in the program it said we should next be singing Amazing Grace.  But before that, Pastor David said, we needed to do something else.  It might make us uncomfortable, but, he said, the Abysinnian Church, and more generally the black church, is a hugging church. Unfortunately, in that prayer meeting in Charleston, they never got around to ending their time with a hug.  But on that night, we weren’t going to leave that out.  We were going to end in a hug.  We were going to look to one another, many of us strangers, and say before we embraced: You are my sister.  You are my brother.  And then, embrace.
About 20 of us were there from Foothills.  There were other white folks in the gathering, but mostly the rest were African American.  Pastor David was right – it was a little uncomfortable at first.  But the joy, and the willingness was palpable, and it didn’t take long to get over the discomfort and move instead into a great relief, and hopefulness for us all, and for our world.

The Rev. David Williams, had called me a couple days before the gathering to invite Foothills and me to join the meeting.  I had first talked to him right after the Charleston shooting; I reached out to him as a pastor of a primarily African American church in Fort Collins, expressing my grief, fear, and solidarity in response to such a terrible act.  We talked about our roles as pastors and preachers – him in a primarily black church, me in a primarily white church – in a time like this, and how to be a voice of both comfort and challenge as we address and seek to transform the continued presence of racism and white supremacy.

I was humbled, and honored, that a few weeks later Pastor David reached back out to me to invite us to share in the Prayer meeting.  And I was humbled and honored to offer a prayer.  But it was that moment of embrace that gave me a better understanding and a clearer vision for how we as a Unitarian Universalist congregation are called to live into this vision of courageous love in our own community.

Which is to say – the provocative proposals team wrote this statement about our leadership, but in that moment, I realized our leadership simply took the form of showing up, being present, and following the lead of others.  It meant stepping outside our comfort zone, praying in a way we don’t usually pray, singing songs we don’t usually sing – but doing so with love, and willingness, and good will.  It was powerful, and as I said before, it gave me a glimpse of our potential powerful future.

One of my colleagues, the Rev. Sean Dennison, recently challenged a gathering of UU ministers to consider what it would _MG_1989mean if Unitarian Universalists were known most of all as the “ones who show up.”  The ones who show up with open hearts, and open minds, with willing hands and generous spirits.  The ones who show up gratefully, humbly.  I took a note at Sean’s question – not because this was a new idea – but because I recognized that this is something we already do pretty well that we could build on, and become known for pretty easily.  Coincidentally, when I had first talked to Pastor David I had told him, if you ever need someone to show up for you, call me – call Foothills.  We’ll be there. We’ll follow your lead.  

If you were one of those who helped make my promise come true last Wednesday, thank you.  And if you couldn’t make it – don’t worry, there will be lots more chances for us to show up and lead through partnership, humility and generosity – for us to further the reach of love all throughout our community, and in our own lives.   Isn’t it a beautiful vision? 

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Appreciative Inquiry Results – from the Transition Team

We began our Appreciative Inquiry Process in January with a series of workshops and conversations where members could share their stories about the church and their sense of our core values and their dreams for our future.  A summary of that process can be found here.

Since those conversations concluded in mid-February, the interview summary sheets were typed into a spreadsheet, and then that spreadsheet was given to a Analysis Team headed by Tim Pearson and including Carolyn Mita, Peg MacMorris, and Ruth Rice.  The Analysis Team produced a report summarizing the trends and information in the sheets.

Additionally, in the workshops themselves, groups of 6 participants came together and summarized their self-understanding of their own trends and most important points.  This information has been captured on a 2-sided single sheet called “Our Appreciative Trends from the Summary of Six Conversations.”

Next, our Provocative Proposals team of Lenny Scovel, Anne Haro-Sipes, Clay Carter and Brendan Mahoney used these two ways of summarizing the interview data to create vision statements.  These statements were to be: stated in the affirmative, linked to a dream acknowledged in the data, and based in a strength already existing in the congregation.   The team came up with a total of 20 Provocative Proposals that can now be used as the starting point for the Board and the Search Committee and for any other leadership body to use as a jumping off point for a strategic plan as well as other plans for our future.   Throughout the next few months, we will engage these Proposals through an interactive display, and in August and September, there will be a series of Chalice Lighting reflections around each of these Proposals.

Thanks to the many people who participated in this process, and to the Analysis and Provocative Proposals Teams for your time and attention and care to summarize and distill and discern the core messages and possibilities within these conversations.  This is a great beginning for our ongoing process of looking ahead and creating the church of the future.

– Transition Team: Anne Hall, Chris Frey, Lenny Scovel, Bob Bacon and Jen Iole

Appreciative Inquiry Documents (paper copies are available in the office): 

Future Needs Exploration Team Formed

The Board of Trustees has appointed Larry Watson as chairman of a four- member Future Needs Exploration Team. He, Bruce Wagner, Lynn Young and Marty Tharp will explore future needs and options for our church.
This team will use information from the Appreciative Inquiry exercises, interviews with the staff to assess needs, and the gathering of other data to help discern a recommendation whether we should or should not undertake a feasibility study that could lead to a capital campaign and other exciting opportunities to fulfill our vision for our religious community.

Appreciative Inquiry Update & Next Steps for the Transition

Greetings from you Transition Team.  

Here it is April already: hard to believe we are 10 months past Marc’s retirement, but the time has flown because of how busy we’ve been.
We’d like to begin by expressing our appreciation for the tremendous turnout we received for the Appreciative Inquiry sessions.  Over 300 people participated in numerous groups.  By all accounts the conversations were rich and rewarding, and if the process went no further that in itself would mark a success.  In the March at team led by Tim Pearson read every single response sheet and quantified them in a spreadsheet. By looking at repeating themes, several narratives became apparent.  In April, a new team, this time led by yours truly, will take those themes and develop some Provocative Proposals, aspirational Calls-to-Action that the Board and the Senior Minister Search Committee can use as we move ever closer to our church of tomorrow.  We look forward to sharing those with you.
And Coming Soon…… The next project the Transition Team will embark on revolves around the various ministry teams in the congregation.  We plan to meet with virtually all of the groups who do the work of the church, and through conversations with each group we’ll hear how these teams see their particular mission, how that mission supports the larger mission of the church, and how they practice decision making and leadership succession.  We will neither offer guidance nor advice,we are there to simply listen. The purpose of these conversations is purely to invite these groups to consider how they currently function, and by extension how they might function even better and sustain their worthy efforts for the long haul.  These conversations should be enlightening and enriching, and we look forward to launching this project in May.  Look for us at a meeting near you!
In recognition that our time with Reverend David Keyes will soon be drawing to a close, the Transition Team would be remiss if we did not offer our gratitude for the wise council and deep wisdom he has imparted to us.  The time of transition will continue after he’s gone, but the groundwork we’ve laid together will serve us well in the work still ahead of us.
In Faith,
Lenny Scovel on behalf of the Transition Team