Report from our Congregational Forum – from Scott Denning

About 20 people attended a Congregational Informational Forum held by the Board of Trustees on the evening of February 22.

Member Jody Anderson presented an update on the Governance Task Force (GTF), which has been very busy drafting comprehensive new policies to help us organize ourselves to better serve our large and vibrant congregation. The GTF drew from the book Governance and Ministry by Dan Hotchkiss and from dozens of large UU churches to draft policies that have been reviewed by the Board. These policies will be discussed in various settings with the Congregation at large this spring, intending to begin a trial period when the new church year starts on July 1. We look forward to a smaller, nimbler, and more vision-focused Board that delegates more operational responsibility to staff, with much clearer written guidance. There will be lots of opportunity to learn and participate in this important process during congregational discussions in March, small group drop-ins, and a table in the social hall.

Treasurer Scott Denning provided a financial update. A bit past the halfway point of the church year, we’re in very good financial shape. Expenses are right on track with the budget and with our spending last year, but our income is substantially ahead of previous years at this point.  We thank those of you who pay their pledges monthly rather than in a lump sum in December. We’ve finally begun to rebuild our reserves, which were nearly wiped out during the Great Recession in 2008-2010. We are tracking down pledges from the wave of new members who have recently joined, and currently project a small surplus at the end of the year on June 30.

Assistant Minister Sean Neil-Barron updated us on membership and staffing. We’ve experienced a surge in membership and visitors over the past year and now have about 600 official members (and about 300 other regular adult participants). Attendance at Sunday services has been at nearly 100% of our physical capacity. Our Third Service Experiment has allowed us some breathing room and has already seen an increase in total attendance.

We’re committed to maintaining a vital music ministry, drawing on the talents in our community and beginning a national search for a Music Director. We’re delighted to announce that as was shared in an email to the congregation, Chris Reed has agreed to serve as our Interim Music Director and will start on March 15th. Chris is Assistant Professor of Music at CSU and previously served as Music Director at Trinity Lutheran in Fort Collins.

It’s time to Answer the Call of Love – from Kay Williams

Foothills HeartFlame logo 2.1.17 ANSWERING THE CALL O LOVE (1).jpgIt’s time. Time to help support all of the important work that Foothills is doing to unleash courageous love in Northern Colorado and beyond. It’s time to affirm what Foothills means to you and your family personally.  And, it’s time to thoughtfully consider your financial commitment and the ways that love calls each of us, and all of us together to respond to the challenges and hopes of our world today.

It’s time to answer the call of love.

We ask all friends and members to keep an eye on your snail mailbox during the next few days – you’ll find information on the ways we’ve been growing, and the ways we are all needed to respond to the needs of today – to meet the rising fear and hatred with a bolder, more courageous love.

To dive in now, be sure to check out our website to see where we have been and where we are going as we discover what it will mean to Answer the Call of Love.

Thank you for your generous support of Foothills and for making all that we do together possible – Kay Williams, Stewardship Team Chair

P.S. If you’ve been preparing your taxes, and thinking you would like to save money on them next time, click here to learn how your pledge of financial commitment to Foothills can provide you with tax advantages for next year.

2 New Ways to Save Taxes & Pay your Pledge – from Cherry & Leonard Sokoloski

TWO WAYS TO SAVE TAXES WHEN PAYING YOUR PLEDGE OF
FINANCIAL COMMITMENT TO THE CHURCH

 If you’re planning how to pay your financial commitment to Foothills for 2017-18, here are two ways to fulfill your commitment and SAVE ON TAXES!

1.      Give appreciated securities (stocks or mutual funds). When you transfer securities DIRECTLY to the church, you avoid capital gains tax, and you are able to give the appreciated amount as a gift. If you sell the securities yourself and give the proceeds to the church, you lose this tax benefit.

2.      Donate part or all of your RMD. If you are older than 70 ½, and you have an IRA, you must take a “required minimum distribution” from your IRA each year. This is taxable income. However, under current tax law, you are allowed to use part or all of your RMD as a charitable gift. That portion will not be taxed.

Important info about a gift from your IRA: The IRS does not allow you to avoid taxes on your RMD and also deduct the gift as a charitable donation. Only one or the other. Therefore, this option is most useful for people who do NOT itemize on their tax return. Please contact Cherry Sokoloski (below) for more information, and also consult with your CPA or other tax advisor.

If you plan to pursue one of these options, please let Cherry or the church office know so we can explain the process.

Remember, to receive the tax benefit, you must transfer securities directly to the church, instead of selling them first yourself. The church will then sell the securities. In the case of a gift from your IRA, it can be cash or securities, but again, it must be transferred directly from the IRA to the church.

Your friendly coordinator for gifted securities,

Cherry Sokoloski:  970-484-5705 or LCSoko@Q.com

Church office: 970-493-5906

9GT? Reflections from Alumni

9th Grade Trip Alumni Hannah Mahoney and Grace Hanley Wright reflect on how the experience impacted them years later.  
“The UU faith teaches us that we are global citizens. We are the keepers of this world, responsible for protecting our environment and advocating for justice for our fellow citizens. Those deeply held convictions are developed over time in the UU youth.
One of the moments in my life that helped deepen those convictions and broaden my world-view was the ninth grade trip, which our 9th graders are preparing to go on. The 9th grade trip takes our young people to the Hopi and Navajo reservations, and is a transformative experience. The first time I cried at the awe-inspiring beauty of nature was at Canyon de Chelle, sitting alongside my UU friends. The first time I understood staggering inequality in the United States was at the reservations—-an experience that I never would have had if not for this trip.
As I have grown to travel the world and use my career for social and environmental progress, I am thankful to all of the people who supported me on one of the first steps in my journey. Today, I encourage you to support these youth at the cake auction or through your donations, and I light this chalice in honor of all of the first steps we are continually taking to transform ourselves and the world.”
-Grace Hanley Wright
Ip1070304_32960406236_o.jpg‘ll ask you to think back on 9th grade, junior high school, that time around 14.  You’re not a kid anymore, but you’re not recognized as an adult. You’re to0 young to drive, vote, make real money- and the adults in your life want to protect you, shape you, or control you.  They’re often confused by you, maybe even a little scared of you.  This loving, courageous community is not scared of teenagers! You saw me, and you demonstrated your faith by pulling me out of school and sending me on the 9th grade trip: 10 days away from home & family, on a bus with 40 of my peers, on an epic journey through Navajo and Hopi lands, growing and learning and working together, finding spirituality and creating loving community.  It was incredibly affirming to be lifted up, at that time in my life, by our greater UU community.  To be recognized as a whole person and honored with the responsibility of belonging.  When I came home from the 9th grade trip, I knew my life had begun.
-Hannah Mahoney
For those of you who do not yet know, the Ninth Grade Trip is a 10-day interactive, educational, and spiritual experience through the Navajo and Hopi nations. It takes place after a series of classes that go into depth on each culture. As you may have guessed, this journey is for Ninth Graders.
Like so much in life, I never really saw the importance of the 9th grade trip until I was in the middle of it all. Until I, the standard quiet-kid-in-class type of kid, lost the ability to speak because I was talking more than I ever had before. Until I was watching a sunset in complete silence, and thinking “No wonder they call this feeling Spirit-ual”. Until everyone was saying goodbye, singing a song that will forever feel emotional to me now. I didn’t get it, until I did.
32156812964_b419a5c80f_zBefore that, it was something my brothers had done, that now I had to do. It was this thing that gave me MORE homework, took some of my precious weekends, and emptied my parents’ pockets a bit. The only highlight was snagging cookies from the cake auction.
But in times like these, I firmly believe that having homework for understanding and respecting other cultures is more important than my current homework. That spending time getting to know those in this community while applying the values of this community is the best way to feel connected to it.
So to those of you who are new, and trying to figure out whether this whole 9GT thing is really a thing, I promise it is. Please support it. And to those of you who already know and are going and just waiting to eat cake, I have some parting advice; If you actually wake yourself up for the sunrise walks, you might get to hear Mitch sing one of his favorite songs. And if you are the person who brings a card deck on the bus, you will become very popular very fast.
-Kerigan Flynn
My name is Zia, I am a sophomore in high school and I went on the 9th grade trip last year. The 9th grade trip, changed the way I live, how I interact with people, and my experience with the UU church. During the 9th grade trip I made so many new friends that I am still connected with today even though the trip was almost a year ago. On the trip, there were about 53 other people on a bus traveling to the Hopi and Navajo lands. Imagine traveling thousands of miles to a place that is completely new to us, for 10 days. I guess you can say we got pretty close. During those ten days, I learned that the UU community is my family and that they are worth everything to me. Because of the ninth-grade trip I have become closer than ever to the UU church and community. My 9th grade trip was the 52nd annual trip, and this tradition is an experience I think everyone should be aware of because it will change your teens life like it did mine.
– Zia

Join us for the Board Forum on Feb 22

On Wednesday, February 22, at 6 p.m., the Board will host an informational forum (this is the reschedule of the forum we postponed from January). We hold these sessions several times a year to keep you updated on work happening behind-the-scenes here at Foothills. We thought we would try a mid-week forum to reach more people. You will be able to hear reports on finances, membership and the Governance Task Force.

By the way, in case you can’t make it, the Governance Task Force and the Board have been hard at work. Over the last couple of years, the Board realized that our church had in place organizational structures that we have outgrown. The Board decided that it was important to our future success to improve these organizational structures, and so we charged the Governance Task Force to lead the change.

What does this mean for you? Well, one change that the Board has endorsed reducing the size of the Board from 11 down to 7. At the same time, the Board supported the idea of lengthening Board terms from two years to three years. We hope this will have several benefits. We think this will make the Board more nimble – I just read a newspaper article about how seven is a great number of people to ensure effective and efficient meetings. (You can find it on our Board of Trustees bulletin board in the social hall.) We also believe that lengthening the Board terms will result in a good balance between fresh ideas and maintaining institutional knowledge. Many previous Board members have said that they were just getting in the swing of things when their two-year term ended. Please, join us on February 22 to hear more about the work of the Board and the Governance Task Force.  All are welcome.